Tag Archives: University

All You Ever Wanted to Know About ER

books

A joint Nara Chapter-ER SIG Event

DATE: Sunday, June 18th

VENUE: Yamato Conference Hall

TIME: 10.00 a.m. — 4.30 p.m.

Speakers:

(1) Ann Mayeda

Integrating ER into the Curriculum

 

(2) Paul Goldberg

The benefits of doing extensive reading online with Xreading

 

(3) Mark Brierley

How to persuade them to read

 

(4) Ann Flanagan

ER:  Building a better foundation for language learning

 

(Click on the presenter’s name to jump to the abstract and bio.)

 

Programme

9.30 Doors open.

10.00 – 10.50: Ann Mayeda

11.00 – 11.50: Paul Goldberg

11.50 – 12.50: Lunch

12.50 – 13.40: Mark Brierley

13.50 – 14.40: Ann Flanagan

14.40 – 15.10: Tea Break

15.10 – 15.40: Panel Discussion

15.40 – 16.10: Closing / Announcements / etc.

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Abstracts and Bios

(1) Integrating ER into the Curriculum

ANN MAYEDA

Ann will talk about the extensive reading program in place at Konan Women’s University. She will outline its framework and then share some of issues and challenges faced by the department in gradually implementing the ER component in the two-year core English program.  She will also delve into some of the reasons why teacher uptake may well be just as, or even more important than learner uptake.

Ann Mayeda is a lecturer and teacher educator at Konan Women’s University. Her research interest focuses on learner development and issues surrounding autonomy as it applies to young learners and young adult learners. She is currently involved in a research project to implement extensive reading programs in schools in Nepal. 

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(2) The benefits of doing extensive reading online with Xreading

PAUL GOLDBERG

Most educators understand that to successfully learn a language, students need comprehensible input, the kind of input that extensive reading provides. However, implementing an extensive reading program can be challenging. Obtaining enough graded readers, and making sure students are actually reading them are among the many challenges.  An online extensive reading system can provide an effective solution. However, it is important to understand that online extensive reading means much more than students being able to read graded readers on their computers or smartphones. It can put powerful tools like an interactive dictionary, character lists, audio-on-demand, and book ratings, right at their fingertips. Another, benefit is students can read whenever and wherever they want, not just while at school or at the library.

Additionally, online extensive reading also provides benefits to educators.  It allows teachers to monitor and track their students’ reading progress with greater accuracy. Teachers can know which books their students have selected, how many words they read, and even their reading speed which is useful since reading fluency is a key aspect of extensive reading. Finally, because of all of the rich reading data that can be collected, online extensive reading is ideal for academics interested in doing research on extensive reading.  In this presentation, the speaker, who developed the extensive reading website, Xreading, will explain how teachers can get the most out of using online extensive reading with their classes, and give a demonstration of the Xreading system.

Paul Goldberg has taught EFL in Venezuela, Spain, Korea, the US, and is currently at Kwansei Gakuin University in Hyogo, Japan.  His main areas of interest include extensive reading and extensive listening.  He is also the founder of Xreading, which he developed because of his desire to make extensive reading more accessible for students and easier for teachers. 

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(3) How to persuade them to read

MARK BRIERLEY

There is plenty of evidence that ER is effective for language acquisition but conclusive evidence is difficult to find, and we often hear that more research is needed. Meanwhile, ER advocates are often convinced that this an optimum activity for the learner, and all that is needed is more reading. However, ER will not work if students do not believe in reading, and teacher beliefs are critical to the success of institutional ER programmes. It is therefore essential to persuade students, and sometimes teachers, of the reasons for reading. It is helpful to have a variety of reasons to meet the variety of values within the audience, and to periodically remind them why they are reading. This presentation will look at seven different reasons: input, vocabulary, collocation, fluency, narratives, literacy and learner autonomy. While linguistic research strives to be more scientific, language teaching may actually be more like a religion.

Mark Brierley teaches English at Shinshu University in Matsumoto, Nagano prefecture. He edits the JALT ER SIG newsletter and works on the Extensive Reading Foundation Placement Test. As well as Extensive Reading he is interested in Low Energy Building.

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(4) ER:  Building a better foundation for language learning

ANN FLANAGAN

Our second language learners are constantly being challenged to achieve higher scores on English proficiency tests like TOEFL, TOEIC and EIKEN to name a few, but fail to hit the mark due to slow reading, and a limited range of vocabulary and knowledge.   This also can be a contributing factor to demotivation in the language classroom.  As Richard Day states in Extensive Reading – Into the Classroom, “Using authentic texts that are too difficult for most language learners, is a little like learning to play the piano. Learners start with easy pieces. Teachers do not ask their pupils to move straight on to music by Beethoven, Mozart or Liszt. In order to reach that goal, beginners start at the beginning by learning to play music written for beginners.”  Not only does ER give students a better foundation in reading skills, but it also transfers to other areas of language learning such as grammar, listening, speaking and writing. ER provides students with an additional support structure to be more proficient in language acquisition. Furthermore, it provides students a tool for lifelong learning and enjoyment. In today’s workshop, the presenter will share her journey both the joys and tears as an ER Coordinator in a private secondary school in Kyoto.

Ann Flanagan has been teaching at Ritsumeikan Junior and Senior High School in Nagaokakyo, Japan for the past 19 years.  She has an MA in TESOL from the School for International Training. Her research interests include extensive reading, teacher training and curriculum development.

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English for High School Students

Date & Time: Sunday, 9 April 2017 – 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Speakers: 1. Masayuki Takano 2.Hideki Yamamoto

Location: Yamato Conference Hall (やまと会議室)

Event Abstract:

In general, teaching English in high school includes more constraints such as the necessity of preparation for university entrance exams. The presenters will share their teaching activities considering such constraints. Audience members will have chance to develop their understanding toward current situations and issues in high school English education. Presentations will be followed by a picnic in the park (weather permitting).

(1) Introduction to English for High School Education

Masayuki Takano (Nara Prefectural Horyuji Kokusai High School)

Recently, Japan’s educational policy has seen an increasing emphasis on preparing its youth for the global economy. As a result, there have been significant changes in its university entrance exam requirements, which in turn impacted Japan’s high school English education. The Ministry of Education also began to place more emphasis on cultivating global citizens who, while remaining rooted to their Japanese heritage, are able to succeed in the global economy. This presentation discusses the changing expectations for high school English teachers, while touching upon its connection with Japan’s university English education.

(2) In-class and Out-of-class activities for Japanese high school students

Hideki Yamamoto (Nara Prefectural Koriyama Senior High School)

In-class and out-of-class activities for Japanese high school students are introduced in this session. In the first half, in-class activities for high school students to improve four skills are introduced. The activities are designed in terms of Paul Nation’s four strands: meaning-focused input, meaning-focused output, language-focused learning, and fluency development. In the second half, a collaborative project between Japanese and Taiwanese students is introduced. As an extracurricular activity, both students in Japan and Taiwan have online discussions before they actually meet with each other. Afterwards, they present their project to the audience together.

「高等学校における英語教育について」

一般に、日本の高等学校での英語教育においては、大学入試に備える必要性などの 拘束があります。このようなことを考慮した授業活動を皆様に紹介し、高等学校にお ける英語教育の現状と論点について、より理解を深めていただける機会を提供します。 講演終了後は、隣接する奈良公園でのピクニックを予定しています。(雨天中止)

日時: 4月9日(日)午前10:00~12:00

場所: やまと会議室

1.「高校教育の英語教育概論」

高野 正之 奈良県立法隆寺国際高等学校

近年、若者への「グロー バル化対応」を意識した日本の教育方針が、大学入試要件 の大きな変更を余儀なくさせ、加えて、そのことが高等学校の英語教育に影響を及ば しています。日本の大学の英語教育との関連性に触れ、高等学校の英語教師への 期待がどのように変化しているかについて議論します。

2.「高校生のための”教室内””教室外”におけるアクティビティ」

山本 英樹 奈良県立郡山高等学校

前半は、”In-class 教室内””Out-of-class 教室外”で実践できるフォー・スキル向 上を目指す高校生向けのアクティビティを、後半は、課外活動である日本と台湾の高 校生たちの共同プロジェクトのオンライン・ディスカッションについて紹介します。

October 2015 Event: How do Japanese-university English learners look to you?

Speaker: Etsuko Shimo, Kinki University, Faculty of Applied Sociology

Date: Sunday, October 4th, 2015.   Time: 10:00 ~ 11:30 a.m.

Venue: Yamato Conference Hall (やまと会議室). Less than 100m from Kintestsu Nara Stn.

Fee: Free for JALT members, and 1.000 yen for non-members

**Optional lunch at a nearby restaurant to follow the event**

Abstract

Have you ever felt that English L1 teachers (ETs) and Japanese L1 teachers (JTs) have different opinions of their Japanese students? In many university-level English learning programs in Japan, ETs and JTs work together for shared curriculum goals. However, they are often assigned different teaching roles and may have different expectations towards their students. The presenter will discuss the results of a teacher belief survey which explored Japanese university English teachers’ perceptions about their students’ characteristics (e.g, personalities and attitudes towards learning English). The presenter will also share implications and suggestions for classroom pedagogy and curricular designs based on the study findings.

「日本の大学英語学習者の印象は?」

近畿大学総合社会学部准教授、下絵津子氏が教師ビリーフ研究(日本の大学で英語を教えている教員が学習者についてどのような思いや考えを持っているかを調査する研究)の研究結果を紹介します。また、研究で明らかになったことをもとに、教授法やカリキュラム開発に関する提案も議論します。

Presenter Biography

Etsuko Shimo (Ed.M. in TESOL), associate professor in the Faculty of Applied Sociology, Kinki University, teaches English and other related courses in their undergraduate programs. Her research interests include student and teacher beliefs, can-do based curriculum development, learner autonomy, and collaborative learning activities in language learning and teaching.

Kinki Unversity, Tomio, Nara is now accepting applications for part-time teaching positions

Dear Nara Jalt members,

Kinki University Nara campus is accepting applications for part-time teaching positions for English language classes at Kinki University, Tomio Campus for the 2012 school year.

Tomio Station is located between Gakuenmae Station and Higashi Ikoma Station on the Kintetsu Line.

We presently have openings during Tuesday periods 3.4 and Wednesday periods 1.2.4.5.

Preferred Qualifications: Master’s degree in TESOL, Applied Linguistics, or closely related field

:Native speaker of English

:At least two years of relevant university
teaching experience

If interested, please send your resume to me at: tom.koch.kindai@gmail.com

Best regards,
Thomas Koch

Associate Professor
Department of Agriculture
Kinki University
Nara