Tag Archives: Nara Chapter

April 2016 Event:Annual Round Table

-The New Academic Year: Resolutions, Reflections and Revelations from the Classroom-

Speaker(s): Various Participants

Date: Sunday, 24th April 2016, 1:30-4PM

Venue: Yamato Conference Hall (やまと会議室) (access)

Fee: Free for JALT members, and 1,000 yen for non-members

We invite you to join this informal discussion to share your professional achievements and/or challenges from the classroom in 2015 and some of your teaching objectives for the new academic year.

Attendees will each be given the floor for approximately 10 minutes to share their teaching activities and are encouraged to bring along sample materials, reports or even items of realia to convey their experiences as we reflect on observations in a supportive setting with friends and colleagues.

This is an ideal opportunity to meet and mingle with your fellow Nara JALT members, new and old alike. We would be delighted to have the company of members from any of the surrounding chapters and guests are of course most welcome. We hope to see you there!

昨年好評を博した円卓会議の開催です!
「新学年度に向けて:決意・振り返り・新発見」をテーマに掲げ、2015年の成果及び新年度の教育目標と共に、
一人持ち時間10分程度で教授法や教材の活用法などを発表し、参加者の皆様で共有します。
メンバーとの交流を楽しめる良い機会です。是非ご参加ください。

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

MELODIC METHODOLOGIES: a movement to motivate young learners

Date: Sunday, August 23, 2015
Time:10:00-16:00 **Please be sure to bring your lunch**
Speakers: Nanae Yukioka, Greg Crawford & Bevan Joseph Bulmer (BJ) and Scott Crowe
Location: Yamato Conference Hall
Guide to Location: Link to meeting location
Fee for JALT members: Free
Fee for one-day members: 1,000 yen

Beat the heat and feel the beat!
Anyone involved in teaching Young Learners should make every effort possible to attend Nara JALT’s mammoth August event: Melodic Methodologies
This promises to be a memorable and motivating event with three marvelous presentations. Feel free to join just one or all three! There shall be plenty of time between presentations to mingle, network and discuss, with an open mic and Q&A session planned for  later in the afternoon to share your experiences and seek advice.

Presentation 1: Title: 1+1>2!: The Power of Team Teaching –Nanae Yukioka

Presentation 2: Using Songs as Effective Tools in the YL Classroom –Greg Crawford and Bevan Joseph Bulmer(BJ) 

Presentation 3: Introducing Magic House Books!-Scott Crowe

Finalised schedule and presenter line up:
10.00                  Doors open
10.30- 11.30   Presentation 1: 1+1>2: The Power of Team Teaching – Nanae Yukioka
11.30-12.30    Lunch and discussion
12.30- 1.30     Presentation 2: Using Songs as Effective Tools in the YL Classroom – Greg Crawford and Bevan Joseph Bulmer (BJ)
1.30- 2.00        Mingle break
2.00-3.00        Presentation 3: Introducing Magic House Books! – Scott Crowe
3.00- 3.30       Open mic session, Q&A, Chapter announcements
3.30- 4:00      Clear the room

Presentation 1: Abstract
Have you ever experienced team-teaching? Have you ever had difficulty making a lesson with someone who has a different perspective on teaching styles and methodologies or someone who has other teaching responsibilities? Have you ever made students confused by team-teaching with a blurred focus? Team-teaching is not easy, but team-teaching itself can show students an authentic model of communication in our real life. The presenter will explore the essence of inter-teachers communication in team-teaching, ways to form the foundation of communication skill through a foreign language, and also share some classroom practice of activating “mind”, “body” and “heart” through classroom interaction using Hi, friends! , an English textbook published by MEXT.
Presenter Bio:
Yukioka is a J-SHINE certified teacher trainer. J-SHINE (http://www.j-shine.org) is an NPO whose aim is to help promote the teaching of English in Japanese primary education by Japanese instructors. It offers training and seminars to those who are interested in teaching English at elementary school. She is currently teaching at a public elementary school in Hirakata and at home. Her 10-year experience of teaching English to young learners convinces her that teaching English is not only to give children an opportunity to learn a foreign language but to foster their intercultural communicative competence.
枚方で活躍されているJ-SHINE (NPO法人 小学校英語指導者認定協議会)公認英語指導者育成トレーナーである行岡七重氏がチーム・ティーチングの極意を伝えます。外国語を通じて、いかにコミュニ ケーション能力の素地を養うか、友だちや自分との対話を通し、「頭」「体」「心」を動かす授業の一例を、文部科学省小学校外国語活動テキストHi Friends! を使った実践より紹介します。

Presentation 2: Abstract
Not getting the most out of using songs in your Young Learner classroom? Take home some great tips and techniques to help you squeeze every last drop of language learning juice out of songs in this highly energetic and exciting presentation. Songs are incredibly powerful and effective learning tools in the Young Learner classroom. Unfortunately, they are also often underutilized. Let Greg and BJ show you how to get the absolute most out of songs in your classroom in this fun and energetic presentation from Fun Kids English. Take home the tools and practical applications to maximize the fun and learning potential of songs in your Young Learner classroom! Your students will thank you with big smiles, great participation and improved language learning.
Presenters’ Bios:
Greg Crawford has been teaching Young Learners of English for 15 years and is a creative director of Fun Kids English. He is a co-creator of Fun Kids English’s Fun Kids Songs CD series and is also the author of Fun Phonics Readers, a series of graded children’s readers from Fun Kids English. Greg is a regular presenter on the English language teaching circuit in Japan and is the owner and principal of Aire English School based in Wakayama Prefecture, Japan. Greg is particularly interested in Young Learners, music for learning, using songs in the classroom, reading for children and phonics..
BJ Bulmer has been teaching Young Learners of English for 18 years and is a creative director of Fun Kids English. He is the owner and principal of Koala English School, based in Wakayama Prefecture in Southern Japan. BJ is a co-creator of Fun Kids English’s Fun Kids Songs CD series and is a regular presenter on the English language teaching circuit in Japan. He has been playing music both as a live and studio musician for the past 25 years. BJ’s interests are Young Learners, songwriting, creating captivating music and reading for children.

Presentation 3: Abstract

Why are so many parents so excited about Magic House Books?Magic House Books are designed to get kids speaking more naturally. Magic House Books are designed to get kids emotionally involved in the imaginative world of the story and help the characters to solve problems using English. Here are some examples of Magic House Books vs regular textbooks.

  1. There’s a ball under the table: This grammar is one of the most useful grammar structures in the English language yet when we teach it to children most textbooks use a ball and a table. Where is the ball? The ball is under the table. The ball is on the table. This is clear and easy to understand but it is not emotionally engaging for children so the teacher will have to make the children repeat it. In Magic House Books, there is a character who is trying to go to bed but there are bugs hiding in the room. So the children must warn the character. “Watch out! There’s a spider under the bed!” Not only do kids use the English naturally, they love to speak and help out the characters.
  2. TPR: TPR is Total Physical Response, which is a way to teach English by having kids do the actions that a teacher says such as jump, walk, run and after a while the kids learn the language. This is very good for children. What Magic House Books has done is take those same actions and added an emotional value to doing those actions. WHY are they running? They are running because all the bugs jumped in the window. As well, all of the action words that kids need to learn are built into the storyline so the kids not only learn the words but they are able to act out the stories in a fun way.
  3. Emotional Positioning: This technique was created by the author of the books. This technique is a very special technique created to help children learn language in a very natural and enjoyable way. It is also used to teach language that is extremely useful but difficult to teach with traditional methods. For example, here are a few of the most used words in children’s books go, come, away, here, this, is and there. In regular books, some of these words may not be taught until the second or third year but in Magic House Books they are taught right away in an enjoyable way that kids love. “Go away.” is used to tell the mosquito to leave and “Come here.” is used to call the cute bugs like the ladybug to the children.

We are so excited to use these books to help your children enjoy English and speak naturally!

Presenter Bio:

Scott Crowe has been teaching children for over 16 years in Japan. He presently runs a chain of English schools in Osaka with some great friends of his who feel very fortunate to have about 500 children at their schools. Prior to coming to Japan Scott got a double major in English Literature specializing in short stories and a degree in Theatre Arts. After graduating he played the lead in a musical and toured through 19 countries. Nothing would prepare him for Japan. He planned to stay for 9 months but …well, he’s still here and still loving it. Early on in his teaching career he became obsessed with the idea of his students wanting to use language of their own volition. This passion became even greater when he met his first son who was from a previous marriage and couldn’t speak English. He began to write and illustrate stories that were designed to have kindergarten children take a vested interest in the language through funny characters in a book who needed help solving the problems in the stories. He was surprised to discover that even with his own students he could get them almost to the point where they would be engaging in imaginative play in English. He loves teaching and is very happy to share his experiences with whoever is as excited about teaching as he is.

Nara JALT Aug 2015 Flyer-page-001

February 2015 Event : A Roundtable Discussion-The New Academic Year: Resolutions, Reflections and Revelations from the Classroom

Nara JALT Roundtable Discussion: Feb 2015

Download Flyer

Speaker(s): Various

Date: Sunday, 15th February 2015, 2-4PM

Join a casual discussion to share your professional achievements and/or challenges from the classroom in 2014 and some of your teaching objectives for the new academic year at this most convenient of venues, just across from Kintetsu Nara Station.

Attendees will be given the floor for approximately 10 minutes and are encouraged to bring along sample materials, reports or even items of realia to convey their experiences as we reflect on observations in a supportive setting with friends and colleagues.

This is an ideal opportunity to meet and mingle with your fellow Nara JALT members, new and old alike. We would be delighted to have the company of members from any of the surrounding chapters and guests will of course be welcomed. We hope to see you there!

Venue: Nara Ken Chusho Kigyo Kaikan (奈良県中小企業会館

Guide to venue: Link to location(Japanese/日本語のみ)

Fee for JALT members: Free

Fee for non-JALT members: Free

NARA: February—Lexical bundles in English for Academic Purposes: On the other hand by Averil Coxhead.

Dr. Averil Coxhead specialises in vocabulary learning, with particular focus on English for academic (EAP) and/or specific (ESP) purposes. Many are familiar with her work on the Academic Word List (AWL)—one of the most well tried and tested word-lists available. In this presentation, she focused our attention on lexical bundles, which she defined as ‘three or more words repeated without change,’ for example, on the other hand. Many of the benefits of learning these set phrases seem common sense to us—gains in fluency, more native-like and idiomatic expression, etc. On the other hand…

We were taken on a whirlwind tour of corpus linguistics, and Dr. Coxhead’s own research, and introduced to some of the challenges that arise in using lexical bundles in the classroom. The following is a top-ten list of lexical bundles used in academic English (Byrd & Coxhead, 2010).

1) On the basis of, 2) On the other hand, 3) As a result of, 4) The end of the,  5) At the end of the, 6) The nature of the, 7) At the same time, 8) In terms of the, 9) In the form of, 10) In the absence of

Dr. Coxhead highlighted the structural features and limited frequency of these bundles as limitations for their use in the classroom. For example ‘on the basis of’ occurred 308 times in an academic English corpus of around 3.5 million words. This means that a learner reading 15,625 words of academic text, could expect to meet this—the number one most frequent lexical bundle in the academic corpus—twice. Not great bang for your buck. These bundles, also tend to be functional, discourse markers that get buried in-between long complex clauses and noun-phrases in academic English. She gave the following as an example.

Clyne’s research provides valuable information on the distribution of a large number of these languages in Australia (Clyne, 1985, 1991, Clyne and Kipp,1996). On the basis of his analyses, Clyne also identifies a number of “unequivocally important” factors as relevant in accounting for different rates of language shift in different communities….

Looking at this extract, it is apparent that a learner would be doing rather well if their major hurdle in comprehending these two sentences were the lexical bundle buried in the middle (highlighted in bold). Furthermore, these phrases tend to lack face validity with learners who already know all the words in the set and resent relearning them as a bundle.

Dr. Coxhead’s message was one of caution—there are so many other things going on in language to compete with a learner’s attention. Not least of all, there are other pre-fabricated lexical formulas; such as, frames with slots, collocations, academic formulas and metaphor. Metaphor, Dr. Coxhead pointed out, with particular reference to Frank Boers’ research, can be much more problematic in L2 comprehension. Dr. Coxhead left us with guidelines to approaching lexical bundles in academic English. We should always be wary of learning lists. We need to draw attention to lexical bundles in context, and revisit them in order to provide the repetition necessary for learning. And we can benefit our learners by being explicit about expectations for learning these bundles.

I’d like to conclude this review noting that Averil Coxhead was one of the most dynamic presenters I’ve seen in a long time. She charmed the audience with warmth and wit, and healthy doses of tales from her homeland, New Zealand. If ever you have a chance to see Averil in action, do not miss the opportunity to see yet another great kiwi teacher-scholar.

 

Review by Leigh McDowell