Tag Archives: Japan

English for High School Students

Date & Time: Sunday, 9 April 2017 – 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Speakers: 1. Masayuki Takano 2.Hideki Yamamoto

Location: Yamato Conference Hall (やまと会議室)

Event Abstract:

In general, teaching English in high school includes more constraints such as the necessity of preparation for university entrance exams. The presenters will share their teaching activities considering such constraints. Audience members will have chance to develop their understanding toward current situations and issues in high school English education. Presentations will be followed by a picnic in the park (weather permitting).

(1) Introduction to English for High School Education

Masayuki Takano (Nara Prefectural Horyuji Kokusai High School)

Recently, Japan’s educational policy has seen an increasing emphasis on preparing its youth for the global economy. As a result, there have been significant changes in its university entrance exam requirements, which in turn impacted Japan’s high school English education. The Ministry of Education also began to place more emphasis on cultivating global citizens who, while remaining rooted to their Japanese heritage, are able to succeed in the global economy. This presentation discusses the changing expectations for high school English teachers, while touching upon its connection with Japan’s university English education.

(2) In-class and Out-of-class activities for Japanese high school students

Hideki Yamamoto (Nara Prefectural Koriyama Senior High School)

In-class and out-of-class activities for Japanese high school students are introduced in this session. In the first half, in-class activities for high school students to improve four skills are introduced. The activities are designed in terms of Paul Nation’s four strands: meaning-focused input, meaning-focused output, language-focused learning, and fluency development. In the second half, a collaborative project between Japanese and Taiwanese students is introduced. As an extracurricular activity, both students in Japan and Taiwan have online discussions before they actually meet with each other. Afterwards, they present their project to the audience together.

「高等学校における英語教育について」

一般に、日本の高等学校での英語教育においては、大学入試に備える必要性などの 拘束があります。このようなことを考慮した授業活動を皆様に紹介し、高等学校にお ける英語教育の現状と論点について、より理解を深めていただける機会を提供します。 講演終了後は、隣接する奈良公園でのピクニックを予定しています。(雨天中止)

日時: 4月9日(日)午前10:00~12:00

場所: やまと会議室

1.「高校教育の英語教育概論」

高野 正之 奈良県立法隆寺国際高等学校

近年、若者への「グロー バル化対応」を意識した日本の教育方針が、大学入試要件 の大きな変更を余儀なくさせ、加えて、そのことが高等学校の英語教育に影響を及ば しています。日本の大学の英語教育との関連性に触れ、高等学校の英語教師への 期待がどのように変化しているかについて議論します。

2.「高校生のための”教室内””教室外”におけるアクティビティ」

山本 英樹 奈良県立郡山高等学校

前半は、”In-class 教室内””Out-of-class 教室外”で実践できるフォー・スキル向 上を目指す高校生向けのアクティビティを、後半は、課外活動である日本と台湾の高 校生たちの共同プロジェクトのオンライン・ディスカッションについて紹介します。

Harold Palmer in Japan: A Lesson from History

Our very own Leigh Mcdowell and Yoko Yasu will be talking to us about Harold Palmer and his  work in the teaching of English in Japan.

Catch them with us first before they take this great talk to the national conference.

Title:
Harold Palmer in Japan: A Lesson from History
Description:
Eighty-eight years ago, Harold E. Palmer—a language educator widely renowned for his creativity and expertise—was invited to Japan as Linguistic Advisor to the Ministry of Education. For fourteen years, Palmer worked tirelessly in Tokyo creating a wealth of language learning tools and techniques that would help Japanese reform their English language teaching.
Come and hear the story of this great man’s attempts to improve English language teaching in Japan in the 1920–30s. This is a story of success and failure; an episode in history from which we can all draw inspiration and learn something about what it means to teach English here in Japan.
Speakers:
Leigh McDowell
Leigh McDowell has been teaching and learning in Japan for over ten years now. He currently teaches scientific writing and presentation at Japan’s top ranked national university, the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST). After coming across the work of Harold E. Palmer in the Master’s in TESOL Program at Temple University, Leigh was inspired to research more and share with others the story of this great figure in the history of English language teaching.
Yoko Yaku
Yoko Yaku teaches English at the Osaka Pprefectural Matsubara Senior High School. She has also recently completed her Master‘s in TESOL from Temple University, Japan. Yoko is convinced that her English would be much better now if she had been taught in junior high school with Palmer’s methodology instead of the traditional Japanese way of teaching English. In this presentation, Yoko will share her reasons for that conviction.
Date: October 17th (Sun)
Time: 15:00–17:00
Location: Nara, Yumekaze http://www.yume-kaze.com/site/access/index.html
See you there!

March 20th RINTARO SATO.

Trying out our brand new venue with a hot presentation from RINTARO SATO.

We are very lucky to get Rintaro so early on our events calender, he’s very much in demand right now with his ideas on this very current  topic.

Saturday March 20th from 5.45 – 7.00pm.

Venue. Please note we are using a new venue this year.
MANABUNARA. It is upstairs from Starbucks at Gakuenmae Station on the Kintetsu Line.
 http://www.manabunara.jp/.
We respectfully request you RSVP  if you plan to attend to avoid disappointment as seating may be limited.
Just send an email to me at oneworld.catriona@gmail.com if you plan on coming or require further information.

About the Presentation.
 
Title: Teaching English in the Japanese EFL Environment.
How Efficacious is it?

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Some words from Rintaro about his presentation.

In the presentation I’ll discuss how English can effectively be taught in the Japanese EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. In this environment, learners do not often have an actual need for communication in English.
It is rare for them to have exposure to English; Rather, English is taught as a knowledge-based subject; Some students study it for tests or entrance exams. Thus I believe teachers should create teaching approaches for this input scarce EFL situation.
 In learning English, the utilization of tasks has been gaining a high profile recently, and the long-established traditional teaching methodology based on the Presentation-Practice-Production (PPP) model is now being replaced by Task-Based Language Learning (TBL) in SLA. (Skehan, 1998).
However, in the Japanese EFL learning environment, we might be skeptical of the effectiveness of TBL in grammar teaching. In the presentation, the suitability of TBL and PPP in the Japanese school context and the effectiveness of PPP from the point of view of skill acquisition theory will be discussed.
I’ll also be discussing other aspects of effective teaching.
 
Rintaro Sato
Rintaro Sato is an associate professor in the Department of English Education at Nara University of Education. His research interests include intake and output processing, feedback and negotiation of meaning. Before he came to Nara , he taught English in public high schools in Hokkaido for over 15 years. It’s very difficult for him to stop playing rugby( though he is not young ). Email: rintaro@nara-edu.ac.jp
Hope to see you there.

Marcus Benevides. Task-Based Language Learning in Japan

May 17th (Sunday). 2pm-5pm
Tezukayama Gakuenmae Campus.

Title: Task-Based Language Teaching ( TBLT) in Japan .

Speaker: Marcos Benevides.
Marcos Benevides is an assistant professor at Kansai Gaidai University. He has
taught EFL in Japan for ten years, at every level from elementary school to
university, from private tutoring to graduate courses. He has been an invited,
sponsored, featured or keynote speaker at dozens of ELT seminars and conferences
in Japan and abroad. He has recently guest edited the “TBLT in Japan” special
issue of The Language Teacher (March 2009), and co-authored Widgets: A
task-based course in practical English.

Abstract.
Task-based language teaching (TBLT) represents the evolution of communicative
language teaching. It is fast becoming the dominant ELT approach worldwide, as
evidenced by task-based concepts emerging in tests such as the new TOEIC, in
language descriptor systems such as the Common European Framework of Reference
for Languages, and in an increasing number of commercial textbooks.

However, resistance to TBLT continues in Japan on grounds ranging from “Japanese
students are too shy” to “Japanese students are not creative enough”, and “the
Japanese demand a teacher-centered approach” to “communicative approaches have
been tried here already and they failed”. In this presentation, Benevides will
explain why each of these arguments is fundamentally flawed.

This presentation will draw on the speaker’s co-authored textbook, Widgets
(Longman 2008) to explain a variety of TBLT concepts. Participants will walk
away with new ideas regarding lesson planning, motivating students and, yes,
clear evidence that Japanese students are extremely creative!

Folks, come if you can. This guarantees to be another interesting and valuable
presentation,for anyone working in any branch of teaching in this country, by a
seasoned and much sought after presenter.