Tag Archives: Events

A Night with Day: An interactive evening with Richard Day

CANCELLED.
We regret to inform you that this event was unfortunately cancelled. We apologize for the inconvenience.
Date: August 8th (Tue)
Time: 18:30–20:30
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All You Ever Wanted to Know About ER

books

A joint Nara Chapter-ER SIG Event

DATE: Sunday, June 18th

VENUE: Yamato Conference Hall

TIME: 10.00 a.m. — 4.30 p.m.

Speakers:

(1) Ann Mayeda

Integrating ER into the Curriculum

 

(2) Paul Goldberg

The benefits of doing extensive reading online with Xreading

 

(3) Mark Brierley

How to persuade them to read

 

(4) Ann Flanagan

ER:  Building a better foundation for language learning

 

(Click on the presenter’s name to jump to the abstract and bio.)

 

Programme

9.30 Doors open.

10.00 – 10.50: Ann Mayeda

11.00 – 11.50: Paul Goldberg

11.50 – 12.50: Lunch

12.50 – 13.40: Mark Brierley

13.50 – 14.40: Ann Flanagan

14.40 – 15.10: Tea Break

15.10 – 15.40: Panel Discussion

15.40 – 16.10: Closing / Announcements / etc.

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Abstracts and Bios

(1) Integrating ER into the Curriculum

ANN MAYEDA

Ann will talk about the extensive reading program in place at Konan Women’s University. She will outline its framework and then share some of issues and challenges faced by the department in gradually implementing the ER component in the two-year core English program.  She will also delve into some of the reasons why teacher uptake may well be just as, or even more important than learner uptake.

Ann Mayeda is a lecturer and teacher educator at Konan Women’s University. Her research interest focuses on learner development and issues surrounding autonomy as it applies to young learners and young adult learners. She is currently involved in a research project to implement extensive reading programs in schools in Nepal. 

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(2) The benefits of doing extensive reading online with Xreading

PAUL GOLDBERG

Most educators understand that to successfully learn a language, students need comprehensible input, the kind of input that extensive reading provides. However, implementing an extensive reading program can be challenging. Obtaining enough graded readers, and making sure students are actually reading them are among the many challenges.  An online extensive reading system can provide an effective solution. However, it is important to understand that online extensive reading means much more than students being able to read graded readers on their computers or smartphones. It can put powerful tools like an interactive dictionary, character lists, audio-on-demand, and book ratings, right at their fingertips. Another, benefit is students can read whenever and wherever they want, not just while at school or at the library.

Additionally, online extensive reading also provides benefits to educators.  It allows teachers to monitor and track their students’ reading progress with greater accuracy. Teachers can know which books their students have selected, how many words they read, and even their reading speed which is useful since reading fluency is a key aspect of extensive reading. Finally, because of all of the rich reading data that can be collected, online extensive reading is ideal for academics interested in doing research on extensive reading.  In this presentation, the speaker, who developed the extensive reading website, Xreading, will explain how teachers can get the most out of using online extensive reading with their classes, and give a demonstration of the Xreading system.

Paul Goldberg has taught EFL in Venezuela, Spain, Korea, the US, and is currently at Kwansei Gakuin University in Hyogo, Japan.  His main areas of interest include extensive reading and extensive listening.  He is also the founder of Xreading, which he developed because of his desire to make extensive reading more accessible for students and easier for teachers. 

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(3) How to persuade them to read

MARK BRIERLEY

There is plenty of evidence that ER is effective for language acquisition but conclusive evidence is difficult to find, and we often hear that more research is needed. Meanwhile, ER advocates are often convinced that this an optimum activity for the learner, and all that is needed is more reading. However, ER will not work if students do not believe in reading, and teacher beliefs are critical to the success of institutional ER programmes. It is therefore essential to persuade students, and sometimes teachers, of the reasons for reading. It is helpful to have a variety of reasons to meet the variety of values within the audience, and to periodically remind them why they are reading. This presentation will look at seven different reasons: input, vocabulary, collocation, fluency, narratives, literacy and learner autonomy. While linguistic research strives to be more scientific, language teaching may actually be more like a religion.

Mark Brierley teaches English at Shinshu University in Matsumoto, Nagano prefecture. He edits the JALT ER SIG newsletter and works on the Extensive Reading Foundation Placement Test. As well as Extensive Reading he is interested in Low Energy Building.

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(4) ER:  Building a better foundation for language learning

ANN FLANAGAN

Our second language learners are constantly being challenged to achieve higher scores on English proficiency tests like TOEFL, TOEIC and EIKEN to name a few, but fail to hit the mark due to slow reading, and a limited range of vocabulary and knowledge.   This also can be a contributing factor to demotivation in the language classroom.  As Richard Day states in Extensive Reading – Into the Classroom, “Using authentic texts that are too difficult for most language learners, is a little like learning to play the piano. Learners start with easy pieces. Teachers do not ask their pupils to move straight on to music by Beethoven, Mozart or Liszt. In order to reach that goal, beginners start at the beginning by learning to play music written for beginners.”  Not only does ER give students a better foundation in reading skills, but it also transfers to other areas of language learning such as grammar, listening, speaking and writing. ER provides students with an additional support structure to be more proficient in language acquisition. Furthermore, it provides students a tool for lifelong learning and enjoyment. In today’s workshop, the presenter will share her journey both the joys and tears as an ER Coordinator in a private secondary school in Kyoto.

Ann Flanagan has been teaching at Ritsumeikan Junior and Senior High School in Nagaokakyo, Japan for the past 19 years.  She has an MA in TESOL from the School for International Training. Her research interests include extensive reading, teacher training and curriculum development.

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February 2016 Event: English for High School Education: Professional Development through Teaching Practice

How did your university students study in HS? What will your JHS students be studying when they get there? What is happening in HS classrooms at present? What is in store for the future?

We very much look forward to seeing you at the event to join the conversation.

In this event, several high school English educators from different backgrounds and teaching contexts are going to share their teaching practices in class. In general, teaching English at high school in Japan has specific duties such as a necessity to prepare students for taking university entrance exams. Considering such, the presenters will share their teaching activities. Audience members will have an opportunity to develop their understanding toward current situations and issues in the English education of high school students.

「高等学校における英語教育 ~授業実践から専門性を高める~」

今 回の講演では、経歴・背景の異なる高等学校教育者たちが集い、それぞれの授業実践を紹介します。一般に、日本の高等学校での英語教育においては、大学入試 に備える必要性などの拘束があります。このようなことを考慮した授業活動を皆様に紹介し、高等学校における英語教育の現状と論点について、より理解を深め て頂ける機会を提供します。

Date & Time: Sunday, 28 February 2016 – 1:30pm4:30pm
Venue: Yamato Conference Hall (やまと会議室) (access)
Speakers:

Masayuki Nakano, Angela Wren, Rachel Stuart, Kazuhiro Iguchi & Adelia Falk

Fee: Free for JALT members, and 1000 yen for non-members

ABSTRACTS

Presentation 1: Masayuki Takano (Nara Prefectural Horyuji Kokusai High School)
Introduction to English for High School Education

Recently, Japan’s educational policy has seen an increasing emphasis on preparing its youth for the global economy. As a result, there have been significant changes in its university entrance exam requirements, which in turn impacted Japan’s high school English education. The Ministry of Education also began to place more emphasis on cultivating global citizens who, while remaining rooted to their Japanese heritage, are able to succeed in the global economy. This presentation discusses the changing expectations for high school English teachers, while touching upon its connection with Japan’s university English education.

1.「高校教育の英語教育概論」

高野 正之 奈良県立法隆寺国際高等学校

近年、若者への「グロー バル化対応」を意識した日本の教育方針が、大学入試要件の大きな変更を余儀なくさせ、加えて、そのことが高等学校の英語教育に影響を及ばしています。日本 の大学の英語教育との関連性に触れ、高等学校の英語教師への期待がどのように変化しているかについて議論します。

Presentation 2: Angela Wren & Rachel Stuart (Nara Prefectural Horyuji Kokusai High School)
A Step by Step Introduction to Debate

This is a 10 lesson debate unit that takes students from simply giving their opinion to fully participating in a full team debate. In the first half of the unit, the concept of debate is introduced, such as, disagreeing and giving strong reasons. In the second half, the students learn about the structure of debate and prepare for their final debate. To build confidence in the students, interactive games are used throughout the unit. This debate unit is suitable for all high school level students, even those with no previous experience with debate.

2.「ステップバイステップ ~ディベート入門~」

アンジェラ・レン、レイチェル・ステュアート 奈良県立法隆寺国際高等学校

単に意見を述べることからチームの一員としてディベートに参加できるまで、10段階に分けたディベートの授業実践を紹介します。対話型のゲームを用い生徒に自信をつけさせるこの方法は、ディベート未経験者からすべての高校生のレベルに対応できます。

Presentation 3: Kazuhiro Iguchi (Kansai Soka High School)

3.井口和弘 私立関西創価高等学校 *Schedule change: Due to unforeseen circumstances Kazuhiro Iguchi will unfortunately not be able to present. Apologies for any inconvenience.

Presentation 4: Adelia Falk (Nara Prefectural Nishinokyo High School)
Textbook discussions – a “four-skills” approach to studying high school English textbooks

It can be difficult to integrate classroom communicative activities and textbook lessons. Therefore, an approach to teaching textbook lessons that is based on a discussion model will be introduced. Using discussion projects as a means of understanding the textbook promotes cooperative learning and speaking in English. In this presentation, discussion-based lessons will be introduced, including how discussion groups are structured and the roles performed by each student before and during the discussion. Exercises based on each of these roles can also be used separately, outside of a discussion project. The roles are designed to teach skills students may find useful for future language learning.

4.「テキストブック討論~高校英語教科書学習よる4技能アプローチ~」

アデリア・ファーク 奈良県立西ノ京高等学校

「英語で話す」「協働学習」を促進するために、ディスカッション形式をベースにして教科書の内容を教える方法を紹介します。また、グループの分け方や、各生徒のディベート前とディベート中の役割分担についても触れます。

Feb Poster 2016-page-001

October 2015 Event: How do Japanese-university English learners look to you?

Speaker: Etsuko Shimo, Kinki University, Faculty of Applied Sociology

Date: Sunday, October 4th, 2015.   Time: 10:00 ~ 11:30 a.m.

Venue: Yamato Conference Hall (やまと会議室). Less than 100m from Kintestsu Nara Stn.

Fee: Free for JALT members, and 1.000 yen for non-members

**Optional lunch at a nearby restaurant to follow the event**

Abstract

Have you ever felt that English L1 teachers (ETs) and Japanese L1 teachers (JTs) have different opinions of their Japanese students? In many university-level English learning programs in Japan, ETs and JTs work together for shared curriculum goals. However, they are often assigned different teaching roles and may have different expectations towards their students. The presenter will discuss the results of a teacher belief survey which explored Japanese university English teachers’ perceptions about their students’ characteristics (e.g, personalities and attitudes towards learning English). The presenter will also share implications and suggestions for classroom pedagogy and curricular designs based on the study findings.

「日本の大学英語学習者の印象は?」

近畿大学総合社会学部准教授、下絵津子氏が教師ビリーフ研究(日本の大学で英語を教えている教員が学習者についてどのような思いや考えを持っているかを調査する研究)の研究結果を紹介します。また、研究で明らかになったことをもとに、教授法やカリキュラム開発に関する提案も議論します。

Presenter Biography

Etsuko Shimo (Ed.M. in TESOL), associate professor in the Faculty of Applied Sociology, Kinki University, teaches English and other related courses in their undergraduate programs. Her research interests include student and teacher beliefs, can-do based curriculum development, learner autonomy, and collaborative learning activities in language learning and teaching.

April 2015 Event: Materials and Methods for Teaching Spoken Language

Date and Time: Sunday, 26 April 2015 – 1:30pm4:30pm
Speakers: Cameron Romney (Sangyo University)

John Campbell-Larsen (Kyoto Women’s University)

With the cooperation of MW SIG, Nara JALT is proud to present this wonderfully practical doubleheader-event to kick off the academic year. Cameron Romney, a Featured Speaker at JALT 2015, will be talking about ways to write supplements that go with commercial textbooks. To follow, John Campbell-Larsen will be talking about how to use materials to stimulate speaking.

-Presentation 1-
Creating Supplements that Increase Opportunities for Spoken Interaction

Speaker: Cameron Romney (Sangyo University)
Cameron Romney has taught ESL/EFL in both the United States and Japan for the last 15 years. He holds an MA in Applied Linguistics from the University of Colorado at Denver. In 2015, he was employed as a Foreign Language Contract Lecturer at Kyoto Sangyo University in Kyoto, Japan.

-Presentation 2-
A Page Full of Text to a Mouth Full of Air

Speaker: John Campbell-Larsen (Kyoto Women’s University)
John Campbell-Larsen is associate professor of English at Kyoto Women’s University. He received his master’s degree in TESOL from Birmingham University and his research interests include Conversation Analysis, Pragmatics and teaching the spoken language.

Location: Yamato Meeting Place (やまと会議室)
Fee for JALT members: Free
Fee for one-day members: 1,000 yen

February 2015 Event : A Roundtable Discussion-The New Academic Year: Resolutions, Reflections and Revelations from the Classroom

Nara JALT Roundtable Discussion: Feb 2015

Download Flyer

Speaker(s): Various

Date: Sunday, 15th February 2015, 2-4PM

Join a casual discussion to share your professional achievements and/or challenges from the classroom in 2014 and some of your teaching objectives for the new academic year at this most convenient of venues, just across from Kintetsu Nara Station.

Attendees will be given the floor for approximately 10 minutes and are encouraged to bring along sample materials, reports or even items of realia to convey their experiences as we reflect on observations in a supportive setting with friends and colleagues.

This is an ideal opportunity to meet and mingle with your fellow Nara JALT members, new and old alike. We would be delighted to have the company of members from any of the surrounding chapters and guests will of course be welcomed. We hope to see you there!

Venue: Nara Ken Chusho Kigyo Kaikan (奈良県中小企業会館

Guide to venue: Link to location(Japanese/日本語のみ)

Fee for JALT members: Free

Fee for non-JALT members: Free

Joint NaraJALT, Tenri University & KELES 2014 Conference

Nara Chapter

Joint NaraJALT, Tenri University & KELES 2014 Conference

Date and Time: 

 Saturday, 1 February 2014 – 1:00pm – 6:30pm

Speaker: 

 Ken Kanatani 先生(東京学芸大学)

 

 Andy Sowter Kwansei Gakuin University (関西学院大学)

Beyond the Controversy
 
This year’s annual Tenri conference will examine the debates between  classroom teachers and  Monkasho which implements  policies to reinforce English education.

13:00-13:20 Opening Ceremony

13:30-14:20 Presentation:
“Incorporating Climate Change and Other Global Issues into Language Classrooms: An updated Inconvenient Truth 2013 as instructed by Al Gore”
Andrew Sowter(関西学院大学)& The Climate Reality Project

14:40-16:00 Lecture:
Changing the Instruction of English at Senior High School 
Ken Kanatani 先生(東京学芸大学)

16:20-17:20 Discussion with the lecturers and participants
What’s going on at language classrooms in Japan?
Where are we headed?

17:20-17:30  Closing Ceremony

17:30-18:30 Tea Party

Location: 

 Tenri University, 1050 Somanouchicho, Tenri, Nara Prefecture

Guide to Location: 

 Link to meeting location

Fee for JALT members: FREE

 

September Event 2012: Ways That Work in Teaching Children

-A Case Study of a Mini-immersion English Program-

Presented by: Takako Watanabe, Watanbe English School

Co-Presenter: Prof. Kazuo Watanabe, Professor of English and English language education at Nara University of Education. 

This presentation will outline how a mini-immersion program has been conducted for the past 9 years with a special emphasis on the first 6 years, comparing these students’ achievements with those of other students in once-a-week and twice-a-week programs.

Date: Sunday, Sept 16th 2012

Time: 16:00-17:30

Venue:Yumekaze Nara (Access)

Cost: Free for JALT members, ¥500 for visitors

Presentation Description:

Our mini-immersion program is defined as a type of partial content based program in which several elementary school children learn English in English under the guidance of an experienced, balanced bilingual teacher.  It has five interesting characteristics: it is language-conscious content teaching rather than contextualized language teaching; it is more or less based on Palmer’s principles of language teaching—from primary skills to secondary skills; it is taught by an experienced, balanced bilingual; it is interactive; the class size is quite appropriate in that it is fewer than ten students.

Some of the outstanding achievements of this program are as follows.  Four out of six students passed Grade 2 of the Step Test, in sixth grade, and two in seventh grade.  One of them passed Grade Pre-1 in 9th Grade in July of this year.  She went to the Prince Takamadonomiya Trophy oratorical contest in Tokyo last year as the 1st prize winner in the local contest.  Two other students are going to attend the local contest in October this year.  Also, three students were chosen out of over one hundred candidates for the Fukui City Junior Ambassador programs – one last year and two this year – and they all enjoyed communication with people without much difficulty in two sister cities in the US.  All of these were made possible by this program; they acquired knowledge of English sufficient to enjoy communication in English with positive attitudes.

Presenters’ Bio:

Takako Watanabe was Fukui Chapter President of JALT for 23 years until last March.  She was an adviser on Teaching English to young children for now-defunct Penguin Books Japan for 10 years.  She has been running Watanabe English School for more than 20 years, where she teaches students varying in age from 4 to 18.  She has extensive teaching experiences at public institutions, such as Fukui University, Open University, a preparatory school, as well as junior and senior high schools.  Her educational interests include helping students develop communicative competence in English.  Raising her two children bilingually with Kazuo Watanabe has provided her with significant insights into her teaching practices.

Kazuo Watanabe is currently Professor of English and English language education at Nara University of Education.  He has been teaching at the college level for more than thirty years.  His research interests include teaching writing, Second Language Acquisition, bilingual education, international understanding education and foreign language teacher qualifications.

NB: This event will be preceded by the JALT Nara Chapter Annual General Meeting (AGM) at the same venue from 14:00-15:00. If you would like to be a part of the Nara JALT team of officers or nominate a willing chapter member, please send an email stating the name of the person who would like to run and the officer position they would like to run for, to the following email address: narajalt@gmail.com. Further details available on our blog.

Marcus Benevides. Task-Based Language Learning in Japan

May 17th (Sunday). 2pm-5pm
Tezukayama Gakuenmae Campus.

Title: Task-Based Language Teaching ( TBLT) in Japan .

Speaker: Marcos Benevides.
Marcos Benevides is an assistant professor at Kansai Gaidai University. He has
taught EFL in Japan for ten years, at every level from elementary school to
university, from private tutoring to graduate courses. He has been an invited,
sponsored, featured or keynote speaker at dozens of ELT seminars and conferences
in Japan and abroad. He has recently guest edited the “TBLT in Japan” special
issue of The Language Teacher (March 2009), and co-authored Widgets: A
task-based course in practical English.

Abstract.
Task-based language teaching (TBLT) represents the evolution of communicative
language teaching. It is fast becoming the dominant ELT approach worldwide, as
evidenced by task-based concepts emerging in tests such as the new TOEIC, in
language descriptor systems such as the Common European Framework of Reference
for Languages, and in an increasing number of commercial textbooks.

However, resistance to TBLT continues in Japan on grounds ranging from “Japanese
students are too shy” to “Japanese students are not creative enough”, and “the
Japanese demand a teacher-centered approach” to “communicative approaches have
been tried here already and they failed”. In this presentation, Benevides will
explain why each of these arguments is fundamentally flawed.

This presentation will draw on the speaker’s co-authored textbook, Widgets
(Longman 2008) to explain a variety of TBLT concepts. Participants will walk
away with new ideas regarding lesson planning, motivating students and, yes,
clear evidence that Japanese students are extremely creative!

Folks, come if you can. This guarantees to be another interesting and valuable
presentation,for anyone working in any branch of teaching in this country, by a
seasoned and much sought after presenter.