Tag Archives: EFL

Are You Listening? Responding to the Challenges of Diversity

Date: December 16th (Saturday)

Time: 13:30 – 17:00

Venue: Takemaru Hall, Ikoma City

Speakers: Parisa Mehran (Osaka University), Gerry Yokota (Osaka University

Cost: Free for JALT members, 1,000 yen for non-JALT members

This final event in the 2017 Nara JALT Program is dedicated to professional development, and particularly to the issue of diversity in our workplaces and communities. The recent implementation of the JALT Code of Conduct has highlighted the need for JALT to formalize the values that help to make it an inclusive and supportive professional network. As members of JALT, it is important we recognize and share those values, especially at times when they are challenged. Along with an overview of the Code of Conduct, this event features direct voices on the realities of harassment, and experienced views on how we can respond. The presentations will be followed by the annual Nara JALT End-of-Year Dinner Party.

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English Language Teaching through Japanese Eyes

Date and Time: October 1 (Sun) 13:00 – 16:30

Venue:  Yamato Conference Hall, Nara City

Speakers:

Hideyuki Kashimoto (Shijonawate High School)

Michi Yonezaki (Konan Women’s University)

Tetsuro Nishiyama (Todaijigakuen Junior & Senior High School)

This Nara JALT event features Japanese speakers specializing in English language teaching. Three Japanese presenters in various teaching contexts with different career backgrounds will share their practical teaching activities and ideas, and their current teaching projects. The audience will have the opportunity to ask any questions or seek teaching advice on completion of all the three presentations.

(日本語版はこちらまたはスクロールしてください。)

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All You Ever Wanted to Know About ER

books

A joint Nara Chapter-ER SIG Event

DATE: Sunday, June 18th

VENUE: Yamato Conference Hall

TIME: 10.00 a.m. — 4.30 p.m.

Speakers:

(1) Ann Mayeda

Integrating ER into the Curriculum

 

(2) Paul Goldberg

The benefits of doing extensive reading online with Xreading

 

(3) Mark Brierley

How to persuade them to read

 

(4) Ann Flanagan

ER:  Building a better foundation for language learning

 

(Click on the presenter’s name to jump to the abstract and bio.)

 

Programme

9.30 Doors open.

10.00 – 10.50: Ann Mayeda

11.00 – 11.50: Paul Goldberg

11.50 – 12.50: Lunch

12.50 – 13.40: Mark Brierley

13.50 – 14.40: Ann Flanagan

14.40 – 15.10: Tea Break

15.10 – 15.40: Panel Discussion

15.40 – 16.10: Closing / Announcements / etc.

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Abstracts and Bios

(1) Integrating ER into the Curriculum

ANN MAYEDA

Ann will talk about the extensive reading program in place at Konan Women’s University. She will outline its framework and then share some of issues and challenges faced by the department in gradually implementing the ER component in the two-year core English program.  She will also delve into some of the reasons why teacher uptake may well be just as, or even more important than learner uptake.

Ann Mayeda is a lecturer and teacher educator at Konan Women’s University. Her research interest focuses on learner development and issues surrounding autonomy as it applies to young learners and young adult learners. She is currently involved in a research project to implement extensive reading programs in schools in Nepal. 

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(2) The benefits of doing extensive reading online with Xreading

PAUL GOLDBERG

Most educators understand that to successfully learn a language, students need comprehensible input, the kind of input that extensive reading provides. However, implementing an extensive reading program can be challenging. Obtaining enough graded readers, and making sure students are actually reading them are among the many challenges.  An online extensive reading system can provide an effective solution. However, it is important to understand that online extensive reading means much more than students being able to read graded readers on their computers or smartphones. It can put powerful tools like an interactive dictionary, character lists, audio-on-demand, and book ratings, right at their fingertips. Another, benefit is students can read whenever and wherever they want, not just while at school or at the library.

Additionally, online extensive reading also provides benefits to educators.  It allows teachers to monitor and track their students’ reading progress with greater accuracy. Teachers can know which books their students have selected, how many words they read, and even their reading speed which is useful since reading fluency is a key aspect of extensive reading. Finally, because of all of the rich reading data that can be collected, online extensive reading is ideal for academics interested in doing research on extensive reading.  In this presentation, the speaker, who developed the extensive reading website, Xreading, will explain how teachers can get the most out of using online extensive reading with their classes, and give a demonstration of the Xreading system.

Paul Goldberg has taught EFL in Venezuela, Spain, Korea, the US, and is currently at Kwansei Gakuin University in Hyogo, Japan.  His main areas of interest include extensive reading and extensive listening.  He is also the founder of Xreading, which he developed because of his desire to make extensive reading more accessible for students and easier for teachers. 

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(3) How to persuade them to read

MARK BRIERLEY

There is plenty of evidence that ER is effective for language acquisition but conclusive evidence is difficult to find, and we often hear that more research is needed. Meanwhile, ER advocates are often convinced that this an optimum activity for the learner, and all that is needed is more reading. However, ER will not work if students do not believe in reading, and teacher beliefs are critical to the success of institutional ER programmes. It is therefore essential to persuade students, and sometimes teachers, of the reasons for reading. It is helpful to have a variety of reasons to meet the variety of values within the audience, and to periodically remind them why they are reading. This presentation will look at seven different reasons: input, vocabulary, collocation, fluency, narratives, literacy and learner autonomy. While linguistic research strives to be more scientific, language teaching may actually be more like a religion.

Mark Brierley teaches English at Shinshu University in Matsumoto, Nagano prefecture. He edits the JALT ER SIG newsletter and works on the Extensive Reading Foundation Placement Test. As well as Extensive Reading he is interested in Low Energy Building.

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(4) ER:  Building a better foundation for language learning

ANN FLANAGAN

Our second language learners are constantly being challenged to achieve higher scores on English proficiency tests like TOEFL, TOEIC and EIKEN to name a few, but fail to hit the mark due to slow reading, and a limited range of vocabulary and knowledge.   This also can be a contributing factor to demotivation in the language classroom.  As Richard Day states in Extensive Reading – Into the Classroom, “Using authentic texts that are too difficult for most language learners, is a little like learning to play the piano. Learners start with easy pieces. Teachers do not ask their pupils to move straight on to music by Beethoven, Mozart or Liszt. In order to reach that goal, beginners start at the beginning by learning to play music written for beginners.”  Not only does ER give students a better foundation in reading skills, but it also transfers to other areas of language learning such as grammar, listening, speaking and writing. ER provides students with an additional support structure to be more proficient in language acquisition. Furthermore, it provides students a tool for lifelong learning and enjoyment. In today’s workshop, the presenter will share her journey both the joys and tears as an ER Coordinator in a private secondary school in Kyoto.

Ann Flanagan has been teaching at Ritsumeikan Junior and Senior High School in Nagaokakyo, Japan for the past 19 years.  She has an MA in TESOL from the School for International Training. Her research interests include extensive reading, teacher training and curriculum development.

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Synergizing the professional development of teachers through videotaping, critical reflection & peer feedback

Date: July 17, 2010 (Sat)

Venue: Nishibu Kouminkan (Gakuenmae)

Presenters: Greg Dunne and Sean Toland

Reviewer: Alessandro “Alex” Stanciu

Professional development among athletes in various sports often involves the use of videotaping and countless hours of close examination of the tape in order to pinpoint any flaws which, once corrected, could lead to an improvement in their overall performance.  These professionals view the video camera as an essential tool in polishing their techniques; the same cannot be said, however, for other professionals, particularly teachers.  In the teaching profession… Continue reading

March 20th RINTARO SATO.

Trying out our brand new venue with a hot presentation from RINTARO SATO.

We are very lucky to get Rintaro so early on our events calender, he’s very much in demand right now with his ideas on this very current  topic.

Saturday March 20th from 5.45 – 7.00pm.

Venue. Please note we are using a new venue this year.
MANABUNARA. It is upstairs from Starbucks at Gakuenmae Station on the Kintetsu Line.
 http://www.manabunara.jp/.
We respectfully request you RSVP  if you plan to attend to avoid disappointment as seating may be limited.
Just send an email to me at oneworld.catriona@gmail.com if you plan on coming or require further information.

About the Presentation.
 
Title: Teaching English in the Japanese EFL Environment.
How Efficacious is it?

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Some words from Rintaro about his presentation.

In the presentation I’ll discuss how English can effectively be taught in the Japanese EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. In this environment, learners do not often have an actual need for communication in English.
It is rare for them to have exposure to English; Rather, English is taught as a knowledge-based subject; Some students study it for tests or entrance exams. Thus I believe teachers should create teaching approaches for this input scarce EFL situation.
 In learning English, the utilization of tasks has been gaining a high profile recently, and the long-established traditional teaching methodology based on the Presentation-Practice-Production (PPP) model is now being replaced by Task-Based Language Learning (TBL) in SLA. (Skehan, 1998).
However, in the Japanese EFL learning environment, we might be skeptical of the effectiveness of TBL in grammar teaching. In the presentation, the suitability of TBL and PPP in the Japanese school context and the effectiveness of PPP from the point of view of skill acquisition theory will be discussed.
I’ll also be discussing other aspects of effective teaching.
 
Rintaro Sato
Rintaro Sato is an associate professor in the Department of English Education at Nara University of Education. His research interests include intake and output processing, feedback and negotiation of meaning. Before he came to Nara , he taught English in public high schools in Hokkaido for over 15 years. It’s very difficult for him to stop playing rugby( though he is not young ). Email: rintaro@nara-edu.ac.jp
Hope to see you there.